Kaleidoscope Trust

Kaleidoscope Trust's Mission

Our mission is to:

Listen to the testimony of those living with prejudice and discrimination in their own countries, recording this in reports and sharing it with those who can make a difference.

 

Amplify the calls of LGBT activists by ensuring their lived reality informs the work of the UK government and Commonwealth institutions to end discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. 

 

Communicate the testimony we gather in order to encourage a better-informed public and political debate about the human rights of LGBT people.

Many challenges remain:

In over 78 countries across the globe, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people face the possibility of imprisonment, attack or even death. 38 off the 53 Commonwealth member states currently criminalise same-sex activity, where laws exist that can be used to prosecute people because of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

 

All legislation that criminalises people because of their sexual orientation or gender identity should be repealed. Law and policy must not exclude LGBT people from claiming their fundamental human rights or their access to non-discriminatory essential services.

 

Progress in law and policy is crucial in advancing the rights of LGBT people rights, but even as the law changes it doesn't always translate to wide spread social, cultural, and religious acceptance of LGBT people.

 

Our engagement with activists around the world shows us that there remains a massive challenge in promoting greater insight and understanding of sexual and gender minorities.

Ways forward:

We believe that ‘evidence-based’ advocacy, wherein LGBT activists convey messages to policy makers and opinion formers backed by data which they have helped to collect and analyse, is an essential way to strengthen the impact of their rights based arguments.

 

We understand that the advancement of the rights of LGBT people will result primarily from a deep change in culture within countries. Increasingly we recognise the role of diaspora communities in the UK to influencing and change the societies from which they originate.

 

We are developing strategies to develop allies among activists within UK-based diaspora communities, with a view to improved acceptance of LGBT in their communities.